ABOUT ARCHIVE

Bus Factor

The Bus Factor for a project is usually defined as the minimum number of team members that would have to disappear (get hit by a bus) for a project to stall due to lack of knowledgeable people. A low Bus Factor means that the loss of just a small number of people can stall out a project, while a high factor means there is some resiliency in the project.

This was how PIXLS.US was very early on with only myself writing for the site (Bus Factor of 1). As soon as possible I tried to find others to help and also made sure the code was available on a public repository (along with being licensed liberally using Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0).

In the case of PIXLS.US for example, we aren’t doing too bad…

Read more...

Your Privacy

When we built the new website for www.gimp.org we moved from a homegrown build system to using Pelican, a Python based Static Site Generator. That migration deserves its own post over on the GIMP website to talk about the process and the specific things we did to support the new site design, but we did use the migration as an opportunity to step up the security of the site substantially. (This was mostly due to the efforts and prodding of Michael Schumacher.)

Security matters to me as well, so when I migrated this to a new site I also implemented many of the same ideas. I’m not quite Content Security Policy (CSP) ready like the GIMP website is, but it’s in my plans!

Read more...

Community

Jehan Pagès recently published his interview with GIMP maintainer, mitch. If you haven’t read it yet, it’s a fun interview with a very colorful person. I highly recommend checking it out!

Mitch at LGM
Mitch at LGM/London last year.

Some of the responses in various places online were pretty normal for GIMP news (eg: full of vitriol), but there was one comment that questioned the inclusiveness of the project that I took exception with personally.

Read more...

Rebuilding patdavid.net as a Static Site

It’s About Time

For almost a decade I had been using blogger to host my personal website. That just didn’t seem to make sense any more, and I wanted an opportunity to fiddle with things a bit. I thought it might be fun to put some constraints on designing a new site for myself while migrating to something better.

I’m leaving these images of P!nk that I used during my initial design and styling because I like them. If I have to keep looking at temp images while fixing CSS rules, they might as well be ones I enjoy looking at. (And I enjoy looking at them because they remind me of my wife - not the other way around…)

Pink for PETA
Large image (should be bigger than column). This caption will continue, though, to test the formatting of the style for this figcaption element and make sure it wraps as expected…
P!nk by Ruven Afanador.
Pink by Bryan Adams
This is a caption for an image that should be smaller than the total column width (on a dektop at least). I’m going to make this caption longer so it will wrap hopefully…
P!nk by Bryan Adams (Yes, that Bryan Adams).
Read more...

Average Book Covers and a New (official) GIMP Website (maybe)

A little while back I had a big streak of averaging anything I could get my hands on. I am still working on a couple of larger averaging projects (here’s a small sneak peek - guess the movie?):

I’m trying out visualizing a movie by mean averaging all of the cuts. Turns out movies have way more than I thought - so it might be a while until I finish this one… :)

On the other hand, here’s something neat that is recently finished…

Read more...

What's New, Some New Tutorials, and PIXLS!

What’s been going on?! A bunch!

In case you’ve not noticed around here, I’ve been transitioning tutorials and photography related stuff over to PIXLS.US.

I built that site from scratch, so it’s taken a bit of my time… I’ve also been slowly porting some of my older tutorials that I thought would still be useful over there. I’ve also been convincing all sorts of awesome folks from the community to help out by writing/recording tutorials for everyone, and we’ve already got quite a few nice ones over there:

So just a gentle reminder that the tutorials have all mostly moved to PIXLS.US. Head over there for the newest versions and brand-new material, like the latest post from the creator of PhotoFlow, Andrea Ferrero on Panorama Exposure Blending with Hugin and PhotoFlow!

Also, don’t forget to come by the forums and join the community at:

discuss.pixls.us

That’s not to say I’ve abandoned this blog, just that I’ve been busy trying to kickstart a community over there! I’m also accepting submissions and/or ideas for new articles. Feel free to email me!


PIXLS.US Now Live!

I checked the first post I had made on PIXLS.US while I was building it, and it appears it was around the end of August, 2014. I had probably been working on it for at least a few weeks before that. Basically, it’s almost been about 10 months since I started this crazy idea.

Finally, we are “officially” launched and live. Phew!

Help!

I don’t normally ask for things from folks who read what I write here. I’m going to make an exception this time. I spent a lot of time building the infrastructure for what I hope will be an awesome community for free-software photographers.

So naturally, I want to see it succeed. If you have a moment and don’t mind, please consider sharing news of the launch! The more people that know about it, the better for everyone! We can’t build a community if folks don’t know it’s there! :) (Of course, come by and join us yourselves as well!).

I’ll be porting more of my old tutorials over as well as writing new material there (and hopefully getting other talented folks to write as well).

Thank You!

Also, I want to take a moment to recognize and thank all of you who either donated or clicked on an ad. Those funds are what helped me pay for the server space to host the site as well as the forums, and will keep ads off the site. I’m basically just rolling any donations back into hosting the site and hopefully finding a way to pay folks for writing in the future. Thank you all!


An Update about G'MIC on OpenSource.graphics

David Tschumperlé has a blog over at OpenSource.graphics and it appears that after releasing G’MIC 1.6.2.0 he had some time to write down and share some thoughts about the last 10 months of working on G’MIC.

He covers a lot of ground in this post (as you can imagine for not having reported anything in a long time while working hard on the project). He talks about some neat new functionality and filters added like color curves in others colorspaces, comics colorization, color transfer (from one image to another), website for film emulation (yay!), foreground extraction, engrave, triangulation, and much more.

Interactive Foreground Extraction
Engrave Filter

A short table of contents for the post:

  1. The G’MIC Project : Context and Presentation
  2. New G’MIC features for color processing
  3. An algorithm for foreground/background extraction
  4. Some new artistic filters
  5. A quick view of the other improvements
  6. Perspectives and Conclusions

David may not write as often as I think he should but when he does - he certainly does! :) Head over and check out the latest news on an awesome image processing framework!


Discourse Forum on PIXLS.US

After a bunch of hard work by someone not me (darix), there’s finally a neat solution for commenting on PIXLS.US. An awesome side effect is that we get a great forum along with it.

Discourse

On the advice from the same guy that convinced me to build PIXLS using a static site generator (see above), I ended up looking into, and finally going with, a Discourse forum.

The actual forum location will be at:

discuss.pixls.us

What is extra neat about the way this forum works, though, is the embedding. For every post on the pixls.us blog (or an article), the forum will pickup on the post and will automatically create topics on the forum that coincide with the posts. Some small embedding code on the website allows these topic replies to show up at the end of a post similar to comments.

For instance, see the end of this blog post to see the embedding in action!

Come on by!

I personally really like this new forum software, both for the easy embedding, but also the fact that we own the data ourselves and are not having to farm it out through a third party service. I have enabled third party oauth logins if anyone is ok with using them (but are not required to - normal registration with email through us is fine of course).

I like the idea of being able to lower the barrier to participating in a community/forum, and the ability to auth against google or twitter for creating an account significantly lowers that friction I think.

Some Thanks are in Order

It’s important to me to point out that being able to host PIXLS.US and now the forum is entirely due to the generosity of folks visiting my blog here. All those cool froods that take a minute to click an ad help offset the server costs, and the ridiculously generous folks that donate money (you know who you are) are amazing.

As such, their generosity means I can afford to bootstrap the site and forums for a little while (without having to dip into the wife goodwill fund…).

What does this mean to the average user? Thanks to the folks that follow ads here or donate, PIXLS.US and the forum is ad-free. Woohoo!


Skin Retouching with Wavelets on PIXLS.US

Anyone who has been reading here for a little bit knows that I tend to spend most of my skin retouching time with wavelet scales. I’ve written about it originally here, then revisited it as part of an Open Source Portrait tutorial, and even touched upon the theme one more time (sorry about that - I couldn’t resist the “touching” pun).

Because I haven’t possibly beat this horse dead enough yet, I have now also compiled all of those thoughts into a new post over on PIXLS.US that is now pretty much done:

PIXLS.US: Skin Retouching with Wavelet Decompose

Of course, we get another view of the always lovely Mairi before & after (from an older tutorial that some may recognize):

As well as the lovely Nikki before & after:

Even if you’ve read the other material before this might be worth re-visiting.

Don’t forget, Ian Hex has an awesome tutorial on using luminosity masks in darktable, as well as the port of my old digital B&W article! These can all be found at the moment on the Articles page of the site.

The Other Blog

Don’t forget that I also have a blog I’m starting up over on PIXLS.US that documents what I’m up to as I build the site and news about new articles and posts as they get published! You can follow the blog on the site here:

PIXLS.US: Blog

There’s also an RSS feed there if you use a feed reader (RSS).

Write For PIXLS

I am also entertaining ideas from folks who might like to publish a tutorial or article for the site. If you might be interested feel free to contact me with your idea! Spread the love! :)


← Older Posts